Physics
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Volume of Gas

Volume of Gas

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Gas is a unique state of matter because it doesn't have a fixed shape or volume. Instead, gas molecules can spread out to fill any container they're put in. This makes it tricky to measure the volume of a gas, but we're here to help! In this article, we'll explore the properties of gas volume and how it affects other properties. Plus, we'll give you some examples to help you calculate gas volume. So let's dive in andproperties of gas.

Definition of the volume of a gas

Gases do not have a distinct shape or volume until they are contained in a container. Their molecules are spread out and move randomly, and this property allows gases to expand and compress as the gas is pushed into different container sizes and shapes. The volume of a gas can be defined as the volume of the container in which it is contained. When a gas is compressed, its volume decreases as the molecules become more closely packed. If a gas expands, the volume increases. The volume of a gas is usually measured in m3, dm3, or cm3.

The molar volume of a gas

A mol of a substance is defined asunits of that substance (such as atoms, molecules, or ions). This big number is known as Avogadro's number. For example,of carbon molecules will havemolecules of carbon.The volume occupied by one mole of ANY gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure is equal to. This volume is called the molar volume of gases as it represents the volume of 1 mol for any gas. In general, we can say that the molar volume of a gas is. Using this, we can calculate the volume of any gas as follows:where mol means how many moles we have of the gas, and the molar volume is constant and equal to.

One mole of any gas will have the same volume at room temperature and atmospheric pressure
One mole of any gas will have the same volume at room temperature and atmospheric pressure

A change in pressure can affect the volume of a gas, as stated in Boyle's law. Boyle's law states that at a constant temperature, the volume of a gas is inversely proportional to its pressure. In other words, as the pressure of a gas increases, its volume decreases, and vice versa.

This can be expressed mathematically as:

P₁V₁ = P₂V₂

where P₁ and V₁ are the initial pressure and volume, and P₂ and V₂ are the final pressure and volume.

For example, if we have a gas with an initial volume of 1 L and a pressure of 1 atm, and we increase the pressure to 2 atm while keeping the temperature constant, the final volume will be 0.5 L, according to Boyle's law.

It is important to note that this relationship only holds true at a constant temperature. If the temperature changes, the volume of the gas will be affected by both the change in pressure and the change in temperature.

Relationship between pressure and volume of a gas

As the volume of the gas decreases the pressure increases. This is because the frequency and the impact of the collisions between the gas molecules and the walls of the container increase

Actually, Boyle's Law is the relationship between the volume and pressure of a gas at a constant temperature, not the relationship between the pressure and the number of collisions between gas molecules and the walls of a container. The relationship you are referring to is known as the Kinetic Theory of Gases.

According to Boyle's Law, the volume of a fixed amount of gas at a constant temperature is inversely proportional to its pressure. This can be expressed mathematically as:

PV = k

where P is the pressure, V is the volume, and k is a constant.

For example, if we have a gas with an initial volume of 1 L and a pressure of 1 atm, and we decrease the volume to 0.5 L while keeping the temperature constant, the pressure will increase to 2 atm, according to Boyle's Law.

It is important to note that this relationship only holds true at a constant temperature. If the temperature changes, the volume of the gas will be affected by both the change in pressure and the change in temperature.

Formula describing the volume of a gas

To add to the information provided, the relationship between temperature and volume of a gas at a constant pressure is known Charles's Law, also referred to as the law of volumes. This law states that the volume of a fixed amount of gas at a constant pressure is directly proportional to its absolute temperature. The absolute temperature is measured in Kelvin (K) and is equal to the Celsius temperature plus 273.15.

Mathematically, Charles's Law can be expressed as:

V = kT

where V is the volume, T is the absolute temperature, and k is a constant.

For example, if we have a gas with an initial volume of 1 L and a temperature of 273 K, and we increase the temperature to 373 K while keeping the pressure constant, the final volume will be 1.36 L, according to Charles's Law.

It is important to note that this relationship only holds true at a constant pressure. If the pressure changes, the volume of the gas will be affected by both the change in temperature and the change in pressure.

Examples of calculations with the volume of a gas

Boyle's Law states that the volume of a given mass of a gas is inversely related to pressure when the temperature is constant. This means that as pressure increases, the volume of the gas decreases, and vice versa. This can be represented by the equation PV = k1, where P is the pressure, V is the volume of the gas, and k1 is the constant in this equation.

Charles's Law states that the volume of a given mass of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature when the pressure is constant. This means that as the temperature of the gas increases, the volume of the gas also increases, and vice versa. This can be represented by the equation V/T = k2, where V is the volume of the gas, T is the temperature of the gas, and k2 is the constant in this equation.

The pressure and volume of gas are inversely related, meaning that as pressure increases, the volume of the gas decreases, and vice versa. This is described by Boyle's Law, which states that the volume of a given mass of a gas is inversely related to pressure when the temperature is constant.

The temperature and volume of a gas are directly related, meaning that as the temperature of the gas increases, the volume of the gas also increases, and vice versa. This is described by Charles's Law, which states that the volume of a given mass of a gas is directly proportional to its temperature when the pressure is constant.

Volume of Gas

How to calculate the volume of a gas?

The volume occupied by one mole of any gas at room temperature and atmospheric pressure is equal to 24 dm3.  Using this, we can calculate the volume of any gas, given how many moles of the gas we have, as follows:volume =  mol × 24 dm3/mol.

How does temperature affect the volume of a gas?

At constant pressure, the temperature of a gas is proportional to its volume.

What is the formula and equation for determining the volume of a gas?

The formula relating the pressure and volume of a gas is pV = constant, where p is the pressure and V is the volume of the gas. This equation is true only if the temperature and amount of gas are constant.

What is the unit of the volume of a gas?

The unit of the volume of a gas can be m3, dm3 (L), or cm3 (mL).

What is volume of a gas?

The volume of a gas is the volume (amount of 3-dimensional space) that the gas takes up. A gas that is contained in a closed container will have the same volume as that of the container.

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