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Types of Triangles

Types of Triangles

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The Four Categories of Triangles and their Unique Geometric Properties

Triangles are a common shape in our daily lives, and ancient mathematicians have classified them into four different types based on their geometric properties. These classifications are determined by the lengths of the triangle's sides and the measurement of its interior angles.

Defining Triangles by their Geometric Properties

Before we delve into the four types of triangles, it is crucial to understand the properties that determine their classifications. A triangle's interior angles are formed by its sides, denoted by Greek letters alpha (α), beta (β), and gamma (γ). The universal rule is that the sum of a triangle's interior angles is always equal to 180 degrees (π).

Moreover, a triangle's sides are identified by lowercase letters a, b, and c. However, it is not the individual lengths of these sides that determine the triangle's classification, but rather the comparison of their lengths.

An Illustrative Example

To better understand the importance of a triangle's side lengths, let's consider the equilateral triangle depicted below. Each side is marked with a dash, indicating equal lengths, and all the interior angles are equal to 60 degrees. This triangle is classified as an equilateral triangle, as all three sides and angles are equal.

The Four Types of Triangles

As previously mentioned, there are four types of triangles: equilateral, isosceles, scalene, and right-angled. Let's take a closer look at each type.

Equilateral Triangles

The simple and most recognizable type of triangle is the equilateral triangle. The word "equilateral" comes from the prefix "equi," which means equal. Consequently, an equilateral triangle has three equal sides and interior angles, all measuring 60 degrees.

An example of an equilateral triangle is shown below, where all sides (a, b, and c) are marked with a single dash, indicating equal lengths.

Isosceles Triangles

Isosceles triangles have two equal sides and one side of a different length. Like equilateral triangles, they can also be identified by the size of their interior angles. However, in this case, only two of the angles are equal. In the example below, sides a and b are equal, as shown by the dashes, but angle γ is not equal to angles α and β.

Scalene Triangles

The name of this type of triangle gives away its defining property - it has no equal sides. A scalene triangle is a triangle with three unequal sides and three unequal interior angles. In the example below, all sides have different lengths, and there are no dashes indicating equal sides.

Right-Angled Triangles

The final type of triangle is the right-angled triangle, also known as a 90-degree triangle. This type of triangle has one interior angle measuring 90 degrees and two acute angles, each less than 90 degrees. The side opposite the 90-degree angle is called the hypotenuse.

In Conclusion

In summary, triangles are classified by their geometric properties, specifically the lengths of their sides and the measurement of their interior angles. The four categories of triangles are equilateral, isosceles, scalene, and right-angled. By understanding these properties, we can easily identify and classify any triangle we come across in our everyday lives.

The Square Triangle: An Overview of Different Types of Triangles

The square triangle, also known as the right-angled triangle, is a unique type of triangle that uses a square in place of the usual angle segment, making it easily recognizable.

Equilateral Triangle

The equilateral triangle is one of the most well-known types of triangles. It has three equal sides and three equal interior angles, each measuring 60 degrees. This type of triangle is often used in various geometric constructions and is easy to identify due to its precise symmetry.

Isosceles Triangle

An isosceles triangle has two equal sides and two equal interior angles. The third angle can either be equal or unequal to the other two. To classify a triangle as isosceles, we can observe either its angles or sides.

Scalene Triangle

The scalene triangle is the most irregular type of triangle. It has no equal sides or interior angles, making it challenging to identify. This type of triangle often appears in real-world objects and can be found in nature, such as in the shapes of mountains and rocks.

Classifying Triangles: Examples

Now that we have a better understanding of the different types of triangles, let's see how we can classify specific triangles based on their properties.

  • Triangle (a): This triangle has two equal angles and one unequal angle, making it an isosceles triangle.
  • Triangle (b): With all three sides measuring the same length, we can classify this triangle as an equilateral triangle.
  • Triangle (c): Given only two angles, we can determine that the third angle in this triangle is both isosceles and right-angled since the interior angles of a triangle always add up to 180 degrees.
  • Triangle (d): This triangle has all three unequal angles, classifying it as a scalene triangle.
  • Triangle (e): The dashes on two sides of this triangle indicate equal length, making it an isosceles triangle.
  • Triangle (f): By using the fact that the interior angles of a triangle add up to 180 degrees, we can determine that this triangle is both isosceles and right-angled.

These are just a few examples of how we can classify triangles based on their properties. Remember, there are many approaches to classifying triangles, making them an interesting and challenging topic in geometry.

Key Takeaways

  • Triangles can be classified based on the length of their sides and the size of their interior angles.
  • The four types of triangles are equilateral, isosceles, scalene, and right-angled.
  • Equilateral triangles have three equal sides and three equal interior angles, each measuring 60 degrees.
  • Isosceles triangles have two equal sides and two equal interior angles.
  • Scalene triangles have no equal sides or interior angles.
  • Right-angled triangles have one interior angle measuring 90 degrees.

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